Saturday, October 25, 2014
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Recommended Reading

The 100-Year-Old Man who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
On his 100th birthday, Allan Karlsson, who has a larger-than-life back story as an explosives expert, climbs out of the window of the nursing home. So begins an unforgettable adventure involving thugs, an elephant and a very friendly hot dog stand operator.

 

And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
Hosseini explores the many ways in which families nurture, wound, betray, honor, and sacrifice for one another; and how often we are surprised by the actions of those closest to us, at the times that matter most. Following its characters and the ramifications of their lives and choices and loves around the globe, the story expands gradually outward, becoming more emotionally complex and powerful with each turning page.

behind the beautiful forevers

Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katharine Boo
Annawadi is a settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are filled with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. But then Abdul is falsely accused in a shocking tragedy; terror and a global recession rock the city; and suppressed tensions over religion, caste, sex, power and economic envy turn brutal.

The Black Count by Tom Reiss
This biography traces the almost unbelievable life of the man who inspired not only Monte Cristo, but all three of the Musketeers: The father of novelist Alexandre Dumas.

 

The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout
Haunted by the freak accident that killed their father when they were children, Jim and Bob Burgess escaped from their Maine hometown as soon as they could. Jim, a corporate lawyer, has belittled his bighearted brother their whole lives, and Bob, a Legal Aid attorney who idolizes Jim, has always taken it in stride. But their long-standing dynamic is upended when their sister, Susan urgently calls them home. Her son has gotten himself trouble, and Susan desperately needs their help.

Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
Growing up in the tiny settlement of Great Harbor amid a small band of pioneers and Puritans, Bethia Mayfield yearns for an education that is closed to her due to her gender. She slips away to explore the island and observes its native Wampanoag inhabitants. At twelve, she encounters Caleb, the young son of a chieftain, and the two forge a secret friendship that draws each into the alien world of the other.

Crime of Privilege by Walter Walker
Pitted against a powerful family when he reopens the scandalous case of a young woman’s unsolved murder, Assistant District Attorney George Becket, is forced to confront a haunting mistake from his own past while. Despite threats at every turn, he is driven to reconstruct the victim’s last hours while searching not only for a killer but for his own redemption.

The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths
When a child’s bones are found near an ancient henge in the wild saltmarshes of Norfolk’s north coast, Ruth Galloway, a university lecturer in forensic archaeology, is asked to date them. DCI Harry Nelson thinks they may be the bones of a child called Lucy who has been missing for ten years. Soon it becomes clear that Ruth is in grave danger from a killer who knows that her expert knowledge is being used to help police with their enquiries.

interestings

The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer
Forging a powerful bond in the mid-1970s that lasts throughout subsequent decades, six individuals pursue challenges into their midlife years, including an aspiring actress who harbors jealousy toward friends who achieve successful creative careers.

letters from Skye

Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole
A love story told in letters spans two world wars and follows the correspondence between a poet on the Scottish Isle of Skye and an American volunteer ambulance driver for the French Army, an affair that is discovered years later when the poet disappears.

 liberty's exiles

Liberty’s Exiles by Maya Jassanoff
On November 25, 1783, the last British troops pulled out of New York City, bringing the American Revolution to an end. Patriots celebrated their departure and the confirmation of U.S. independence. But for tens of thousands of American loyalists, the British evacuation spelled worry, not jubilation. Facing grave doubts about their futures, some sixty thousand loyalists decided to leave their homes and become refugees elsewhere in the British Empire.

life after life

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
What if you could live again and again, until you got it right? On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born to an English banker and his wife.. Does Ursula’s apparently infinite number of lives give her the power to save the world from its inevitable destiny? And if she can — will she? Darkly comic, startlingly poignant, and utterly original — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best.

 love anthony

Love Anthony by Lisa Genova
Olivia’s dream of a ‘normal’ life shattered when her son, Anthony, was diagnosed with autism at age three. He didn’t speak. He hated to be touched. He almost never made eye contact. And just as Olivia was starting to realize that happiness and autism could coexist, Anthony was gone. Now she’s alone on Nantucket, desperate to find meaning in her son’s short life, when a chance encounter with another woman brings Anthony alive again in a most unexpected way.

 me before you

Me Before You by JoJo Moyes
Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl who has never been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working Will Traynor, who is wheelchair bound after a motorcycle accident. Will is acerbic, moody, bossy–but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

 middlesteins

The Middlesteins by Jami Attenberg
For more than thirty years, Edie and Richard Middlestein shared a solid family life together in the suburbs of Chicago. But now things are splintering apart, for one reason, it seems: Edie’s enormous girth. She’s obsessed with food–thinking about it, eating it–and if she doesn’t stop, she won’t have much longer to live. When Richard abandons his wife, it is up to the next generation to take control.

one summer

One Summer: America 1927 by Bill Bryson
1927 was the year Americans attempted and accomplished outsized things and came of age in a big, brawling manner. What a country. What a summer. Bill Bryson presents a fascinating and gripping narrative featuring such outsized heroes as Charles Lindbergh, Babe Ruth, and yes Herbert Hoover, and a gallery of criminals (Al Capone), eccentrics (Shipwreck Kelly), and close-mouthed politicians (Calvin Coolidge).

power of habit

The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
Identifies the neurological processes behind behaviors, explains how self-control and success are largely driven by habits, and shares scientifically-based guidelines for achieving personal goals and overall well-being by adjusting specific habits.

 requiem

Requiem by Frances Itani
In 1942 the government removed Bin Okuma’s family from their home on British Columbia’s west coast and forced them into internment camps. One hundred miles from the “Protected Zone”’ they formed makeshift communities. Fifty years later, Bin embarks on an unforgettable journey into his past. He travels across the country to find the biological father who made a fateful decision that nearly destroyed the family.

revolutionary summer

Revolutionary Summer by Joseph J. Ellis
During the summer of 1776, the Continental Congress and the Continental Army were forced to make decisions on the run, improvising as history congealed around them. In a brilliant and seamless narrative, Ellis meticulously examines the most influential figures in this propitious moment. He weaves together the political and military experiences as two sides of a single story, and shows how events on one front influenced outcomes on the other.

secret keeper

The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton
During a party at the family farm, Laurel spies a stranger coming up the road and sees her mother speak to him. She will witness something that challenges everything she knows about her mother. Fifty years later, Laurel returns to the family farm for Dorothy’s ninetieth birthday and finds herself overwhelmed by questions she has not thought about for decades.

tell the wolves

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Brunt
It is 1987, and only one person has ever truly understood fourteen-year-old June Elbus — her uncle, the renowned painter Finn Weiss. Shy at school and distant from her older sister, June can only be herself in Finn’s company; he is her godfather, confidant, and best friend. So when he dies, far too young, of a mysterious illness her mother can barely speak about, June’s world is turned upside down. But Finn’s death brings a surprise acquaintance into June’s life — someone who will help her to heal, and to question what she thinks she knows about Finn, her family, and even her own heart.

 where'd you go Bernadette

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she’s a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she’s a disgrace; and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette disappears. It began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica.